How to use ‘a work of’ in a sentence

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… there may be an adaptive explanation with the composite having nearly the strength of the strongest dentine and a work of fracture greater than even the most ductile dentine. Coyote dentine is considerably stronger than human dentine. In…

… an order-preserving map from silting objects in to bounded t-structures on and show that the map is bijective if and only if is silting-discrete if and only if is t-discrete. Based on a work of Qiu and Woolf, the above result is applied to…

… algebraic groups analogous to Shimura and Deligne’s point of view of the theory of complex multiplication. 2. a work of noncommutative algebraic geometry. We are interested only by the first step, and recall the known results in the…

… contemporary art. Almost all the contents and objects of everyday life became a work of art in the condition of searching for the aesthetic. Since aesthetic theory was shifted from the artist-centered or a work of art-centered to the audience,…

We analyse the presence of nonradial oscillations in Cepheids, a problem which has not been theoretically revised since the work of Dziembowsky (1977) and Osaki (1977). Our analysis is motivated by a work of Moskalik et al. (2004) which…

a work of art into quantifiable characteristics – even in a subjective but possibly unanimous way – would make it possible to explain the divergences between audiences and changes of appreciation over time. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999 motion picture, quality measures in art,…

Water 2 ̆ 7 s Edge, and The Water 2 ̆ 7 s Edge Writing, is a work of practice-led research in the field of creative writing. Practice-led research, which refers to research undertaken in the process of making a creative artwork, has become…

Watchmen: as a Work of Literature” asserts the premise that literature contains complexity and themes, as well as literary devices, and decided that is a graphic novel meets these requirements, it is also considered literature. The graphic…

… phil­osophical language game,” it is the announced aim of this book to provide a work of translation and clarification of Apel’s special­ized efforts […] in effect an orientation to Apel’s work. The book divides into an Introduction, 8…

Walden (1854), by the American author Henry David Thoreau (1817 […] 1862), is explored as a work of literature with significant implications for environmental ethics in contemporary architectural practice. This reading challenges ethical…

… plays, in their capacity as the “grammar” puppet plays with usingLevi-Strauss’s structuralism paradigm. This is going to be gained the interpretation that Lakon Wahyu Cakraningratis a work of art presenting some knowledge of Javanese culture…

… catharsis in the Poetics. As much a work of philosophy as of classical textual analysis, McCoy’s work aims at a deeper understanding of the virtues of vulnerability for individuals and societies alike…

… vast amount of literature published. As a work of reference it is intended for scientists active in magnetism research. To this dual purpose, Volume 19 is composed of topical review articles written by leading authorities. In each of these…

… other hand the data about culture and geography of people come to light. Dîvânü Lugâti’t Türk, which is a work of Karahan Turkish era, is also very important as it reflects the vocabulary of 11 th century Turkish language. There are 8783…

Vitali Ginzburg deserved a Nobel prize fifty years back, Leonid Keldysh, academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences, who was Ginzburg’s disciple, told Tass. “The Ginzburg-Landau phenomenal theory of superconductivity deserved a Nobel prize right upon being produced. It was a work of intransient importance” (1 / 2 page) …

… equipment without sacrificing the capture of surface texture information as well as additional knowledge regarding the desirable amount of perceived gloss and texture that can be used in making lighting and rendering choices that are pleasing to observers while still representing the physical features of a work of art…

Very rarely is one able to extract from a work of literature, or any work for that matter, a truly profound insight into a person’s most defining views on life, the universe, and existence. Alighieri’s The Divine Comedy, however, remains one of these works. With a journey to reach not only a turning point in an individual man’s life, but the very peak of the universe as it was believed to exist, this poem remains one of the grandest, and few, works to take the whole of existence into account in its contemplations…

Vel?zquez (1599 – 1640) In a Spain dominated by a fervent religiosity, the painter Diego de Silva y Vel?zquez emerged as a master practitioner of a secular form of art. His masterpiece, Las Meninas, is a painting full of mystery and intrigue, a work of startling intellectual and artistic complexity and the culmination of a unique relationship between Vel?zquez and his patron, King Philip IV of Spain. From 1623, Vel?zquez was employed to paint the family and court of Philip IV. His paintings remain as an enormously insightful record of the development of the royal family and, in many ways, the decline of the most powerful court in Europe. Under the watchful eye of Philip’s first minister, Count-Duke Olivares, Vel?zquez single-handedly redefined the image of the Spanish monarchy, in manner akin to a modern-day public relations campaign. Whilst Vel?zquez’s output was dominated by royal portraiture, he also produced psychologically insightful studies of people at the margins of society, such as the buffoons of the royal court or the poor of Seville. Vel?zquez’s unique painting style, which combined at one time or another dramatic lighting, intense coloring and ever more loose brushstrokes, was dominated by a single preoccupation – to capture a degree of naturalism hitherto unachieved in the history of art. His work came to be admired by many in the centuries to come and as the French painter Edouard Manet remarked, ‘He is the painter of painters’. Works featured in this program include The Waterseller of Seville (1620, Wellington Museum, London), The Forge of Vulcan (1630, Prado, Madrid), The Surrender of Breda (1635, Prado, Madrid), Juan De Pareja (1650, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, New York) and Las Meninas (1656, Prado, Madrid) …

Various paging. Masonry a work of darkness. Lebbeus Armstrong. […] Sermon on secret societies. Daniel Dow. […] Sermon on masonry. W. P. M’Nary. […] Sermon on secretism. R. T. Cross. […] Sermon on masonry. James Williams. […] Sermon on Odd-Fellwship and other secret societies. J. Sarver. […] Grand lodge masonry. J. Blanchard. […] Freemasonry, a fourfold conspiracy. J. Blanchard. […] The relation of the Christian church to secret societies. H. H. George. […] Address of J. G. Carson […] . Secret societies. […] Secrecy in its relation to the family […] . M. S. Drury. […] 13 reasons why a Christian should not be a freemason. Robert Armstrong. […] Are masonic oaths binding on the initiate? A. L. Post. Mode of access: Internet…

…Ütluste eritüübina määratletavat ilmingut nimega vellerism on senises eestikeelses teaduskirjanduses käsitletud napilt. Kuigi vellerismi peetakse üldiselt rahvusvaheliselt levinuks, ei saa siiski rääkida selle ühetaolisest populaarsusest kõigis keeltes ja kultuurides. Ei ole ka ühtset arusaama, millal on see väikevorm alguse saanud ning kas vellerismi algust tuleks otsida rahvaluulest või kirjandusest. Samad küsimused kerkivad ka eestikeelse vellerismi uurimisel. Artiklis annan sissevaate vellerismi kujunemisse ja käsitlustesse eri keeltes ning vaatlen seesuguste väljendite esmakordset esinemist eesti keeles vanemate allikate – kirjavahetuste, käsikirjaliste ainekogude, kalendrite, juturaamatute põhjal.  My article focusses on a phenomenon of figurative speech called Wellerism. The term originates from a work of fiction, named after the central character of Charles Dickens’s novel The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club (1836 – 1837), Samuel Weller, who uses plenty of original expressions. Even today, the researcher of proverbs Archer Taylor is mistakenly considered to have coined the term Wellerism, although he only applied this term which had started to spread both in England and America already earlier almost simultaneously with the publishing of the novel. We have to say that already the contemporaries of Dickens noticed that the expressions, which had become popular due to this work, were nothing new as figurative minor forms—such forms had been known in different languages already much earlier. Wellerism is defined as an expression consisting, as a rule, of three parts: a saying, a speaker and an accompanying sentence or a description of the situation. Some kind of a cliché, such as a proverb, can  be used as the saying. The humorous moments caused by the conflict between these two parts play a central role here. Similar expressions to Wellerism can be dated back for centuries, and more and more studies can confirm that they are spread among almost all nations. There is still no solid understanding about the precise starting point of the phenomenon or about whether such figurative expressions can be considered as the phenomena of folklore or literature. Traditionally, Wellerism is studied as a genre belonging to the so-called minor forms of folklore (proverbs, sayings), differentiating between popular or original Wellerisms and literary or secondary Wellerisms. The study of older texts is made difficult by the scarcity…

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